Sunday, February 6, 2011

The Divine Lorraine Hotel, Philadelphia, PA


Ballroom in 2006, in the midst of being gutted; the marble floor was in the process of being pulled up.


Personal note: I feel compelled by recent reports of the deteriorating conditions at The Divine Lorraine to write this article, which I may only accompany by some photos taken in the span of a couple of hours in 2006. The Lorraine is NRHP listed for both its architectural import and its significance in civil rights as the first integrated hotel in Philadelphia. It is currently in significant danger of demolition-by-neglect. Because the building is now gutted and deteriorating, I cannot reshoot the photographic content for this article, so I must present what I have, warts and all.


View of building from tiny porch attached to bedroom.


Not-So-Humble Beginnings

The building currently known as the Divine Lorraine Hotel has been a fixture on North Broad Street in Philadelphia for over a century. It was designed, as the “Lorraine Apartments”, by controversial architect Willis G. Hale in his characteristically theatrical high-Victorian style. Construction began in 1892 and took two years to finish. At the time, the building was praised by few – Hale’s style was seen as outdated, being typified by extravagant ornamentation, and many viewed the Lorraine as bombastic.

Nevertheless, it was a very luxurious building, and among the first high-rise apartment buildings in Philadelphia. Offering an in-house staff that eliminated the need for personal servants, a central kitchen in which meals were prepared for tenants, and two luxurious ballrooms for events, the Lorraine briefly attracted the upper crust of city renters. In 1900, it was purchased by a new interest which converted it into a hotel. It continued to attract a wealthy clientele until its sale in 1948 to Father Divine, who anticipated a very different use for the structure.


A typical hallway in the Lorraine.



Typical bedrooms in the Lorraine contained features such as this small fireplace.



One of the few beds remaining when the building was photographed.



Most of the artifacts that had been left in the Lorraine were moved down to first floor and affixed with price tags; apparently, these books weren't worth the hassle.



The most common artifact found in the hotel: a copy of the Bible.



The only television seen in the entire structure; Father Divine was said to have frowned on the viewing of TV.



A bathtub was pulled halfway out of this crumbling bathroom.



A room on the Ninth Floor. This is supposed to have been the room in which Father Divine's wife lived; even the head of the movement was not exempted from the rules prohibiting cohabitation.



A view from one room into the room across the hall. The rooms were painted in a variety of pastel colors.


Introduction of the Divine

George Baker was born, likely in Maryland, to two former slaves. From humble beginnings as a gardener and itinerant Baptist preacher, he came to envision himself first as a divine messenger, and eventually as a deity himself. He granted himself the title of Reverend Major Jealous Divine, and became known to his rapidly growing congregations as Father Divine. In his early years, his preachings focused primarily on the virtues of celibacy and the downplaying of gender roles.


The front of the tenth-floor chapel, originally one of two ballrooms in the Lorraine Apartments.


Father Divine and his congregation moved frequently in the early years, and eventually settled in New York. Several times, he ran afoul of the law, and he moved around the city, and outside the city. Meanwhile, his message shifted towards civil rights. Unlike many black preachers of the day, he was not polarized against whites – Father Divine’s message centered around equality, and he focused on desegregation, anti-lynching legislation, and similar issues. He formalized his movement into a church, the International Peace Mission Movement.

In 1942, Divine’s legal troubles caused him to flee New York; he ended up in Philadelphia. In 1944, Johnny Mercer attended a sermon entitled “You got to accentuate the positive and eliminate the negative.” Mercer wrote his trademark song the following year. Meanwhile, Divine decided to open up a number of residences for his flock, which he referred to as Heavens. In 1948, he purchased the Lorraine Hotel for $485,000, reopening it as a Heaven under its new, and final, name: The Divine Lorraine.


A Bible lays open to the book of Job on a dresser; this would almost seem a fitting metaphor for the building itself, were it not so likely that someone had intentionally left it like that.

Because of his focus on celibacy, even within marriage, Divine divided the structure by floors; men and women would not share a floor. Modesty was expected of the residents; women had to wear long skirts, and men, long pants. Alcohol, drugs, and cigarettes were forbidden, as was swearing, mixing of the sexes outside of meals and church functions, and any form of blasphemy.

The clientele of the Lorraine changed drastically; congregants were simply given rooms to live in, as they were expected to have already turned over their savings to Divine. Additional rooms were available to rent, but the prices were low, and the Lorraine no longer attracted the upper-class residents that once called it home. The hotel was fully integrated, with no preference for race, and religious belief outside the movement was accepted so long as it did not contradict the teachings of Father Divine. A soup kitchen was operated out of the first floor of the building, providing hot meals to the indigent of the neighborhood.


When Father Divine took over the Lorraine, this statuette was affixed to the front. If any readers know who the statue portrays, please let me know.


Father Divine passed away at his estate in Gladwyne, PA, in 1965. His second wife, Edna Rose Ritchings, who was significantly younger than he, took over leadership of the movement. The congregation continued to operate the Divine Lorraine. In the early 70s, cult leader Jim Jones split off from the International Peace Mission Movement, forming the Peoples Temple – the group which would eventually commit mass suicide in Jonestown. Eventually, the movement began to dwindle – Father Divine’s teachings forbade sex, and the movement stopped attracting new members – and most of the Heavens had to be sold. In 2000, the congregation parted with the Divine Lorraine Hotel.


A wide view of the chapel just after first light.



Detail of the proscenium over the tiny stage from which Father Divine gave his sermons.



The rear of the chapel.



Detail of the "God" inlay at the rear of the chapel.


Sale, Gutting, and Neglect

David Peace, an adherent to the International Peace Mission Movement, continued to reside in the building from 2000 until 2006, maintaining it to the best of his abilities. This proved relatively easy to do – because in a rare turn for an economically beleaguered neighborhood, area dealers and squatters had so much respect for the legacy of Father Divine that there were few attempts to trespass in, or vandalize, the structure.

The Divine Lorraine was listed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 2002. In May 2006, Philadelphia developer Michael Treacy, Jr. purchased the building and formed a development team to oversee its use. He promised that the building would be rehabilitated as a mixed-use property, consisting of 135 condominiums and a large-scale restaurant, and that the historical integrity of the landmark would be preserved.


Most of the furniture and other artifacts from the Lorraine were gathered on the first floor and affixed with prices, ready for a rummage sale.


For a few months, little happened, and then work crews began to show up at the building. But they were not there to rehab – little by little, they began to tear the building apart, selling off pieces to architectural salvage companies and interested individuals. Marble floors were removed from the ballroom and chapel; wooden floors were torn up and bundled, bathtubs were gathered in hallways. Even the ornate plasterwork was torn apart. And after the building was thoroughly scavenged, it was completely abandoned, without any significant measure being taken even to shore up the roofs.


A plywood walkway was constructed at the rear entrance to facilitate moving demolition equipment in and out - as well as objects being sold, such as the kitchen equipment lined up to the left.


As it turns out, the developer had no intention of rehabilitating and preserving the Lorraine unless the city and neighborhood bowed to a number of concessions, including fiscal benefits, additional land acquisition, and favorable zoning. When the developer did not receive the requested concessions, he gutted the building, sold what he could for salvage, and left the structure to rot. David Peace no longer watches over it, and having gutted, it is no longer treated with the reverence it once was. It has become a home to squatters and members of the drug community, and has been heavily vandalized; its exterior is now covered in graffiti. Water damage too has quickly become an issue. Less than half a decade’s worth of neglect has reduced the Divine Lorraine to an endangered shell.



The grand stairwell from the first to the second floors was sheathed in plywood; recent photographs indicated that the stairs themselves were torn apart for the marble, and only an iron skeleton remains.



When I visited the Lorraine in 2006, salvage was well underway. In this hallway, the hardwood floor has been torn up and bundled for sale.



In this room, the tub was pulled from the bathroom, and the marble tiles were then ripped out and placed against the wall. The doors have also been removed.



A room in which the hardwood floor has already been scavenged; it appears that the door is next.



The door here has been removed, as well as the brass hinge. Even the screws from the switch-plate were taken.



Throughout the lower floors of the building, various like objects were grouped together by kind, presumably to facilitate sale. Here, doors are stacked against each other in rows.



Dozens of radiators filled another room.



The bathtubs were removed from this floor's bathrooms and lined up in the hallway.



Even the mattresses, unused in over half a decade, were priced to sell.


As a Closing Note

It is unacceptable that this building, a national as well as a local landmark, is falling prey to demolition-by-neglect. While the figure of Father Divine and the nature of his movement may be controversial, it is uncontroversial that he was an important precursor to the civil rights struggle, and that the Divine Lorraine had a significant role in this history, both by association and by virtue of its status as the first integrated hotel in Philadelphia. Further, it is a remarkable building, and one of the few Hale commissions still standing. The avarice of a developer who gutted the building, “taking her for all she was worth”, and then walked away, should not be allowed to cause the eventual destruction of this treasure.

I would urge all of my readers in Philadelphia to get involved on some level with the preservation of this structure. And I would urge all of my readers outside of Philadelphia to spread the word. If there is enough public outcry over this, if the right people are appropriately shamed, perhaps the Divine Lorraine stands a chance of being a jewel of Philadelphia once again.


This tiny cross placed upon a lightswitch had managed to endure.

77 comments:

Brice said...

Thanks for the visit. Sad to see that this place is in danger! Good luck to preserve it

bekahb said...

wow wow wow!!! (by the way, i got my print in the mail and absolutely love it! thanks!!!)

Liuba said...

What a great photos, well done, I love all your posts. God keep u !!!

Leddy Landers said...

That;s a heart-breaker. I love these photos you take. Great job!

Helena Rose said...

What a sad story to accompany such a beautiful building. I hope that it is able to be preserved...

MrsJenB said...

I love the Divine Lorraine so much. I've been interested in it for years, ever since my roommate and I stumbled upon it while lost in the car one day. I couldn't believe that, having lived in Philadelphia my entire life up to that point, I had never seen it. I've since learned everything I can about it, and hope desperately that the building is saved in some way. There is just no way that such a beautiful, historically rich place should be allowed to fall into complete decay. It's heartbreaking.

Mike Oscar Hotel said...

Fantastic post. If we don't advocate for history, we are certainly doomed ourselves.

hawk said...

Interesting write up, however the photographs seem to contradict with your post "on Ruin Porn".

Gaston Studio said...

I agree with you that it's unacceptable to have a national treasure become endangered, but it's happening everywhere. I'm active in our local historical society and it's a constant and daily battle. Evidently, there were no covenants on this buildling when the developer bought it for rehab. Covenants are extremely imporant but they must also be enforced. Good luck with this project and thank you so much for sharing. Hopefully, your post and photos will encourage others to save their towns.

fuzzy flirt said...

This was most upsetting to me being a Philadelphia resident and passing this building going to coming from work. There are so many buildings on broad street that are falling apart I wasn't aware that any of them had any historical value. Thanks for spreading the knowledge!

Kariama Bolden said...

so much potiential i love this building this work of art... I live in philadelphia all my life and ride the bus pass my dream every day i wish that i could have the opportunity just to enter the beautiful work of art. and or be a part of the development, my dream my dream my dream!

Forrest Snyder said...

I was lucky enough to tour the Divine Lorraine in the early 1980's as an intern with the Philadelphia Historical Commission.

My recollection (foggy at best) was that it was still being used as some sort of rooming house/halfway house at the time, with many areas off limits. However, the ballrooms and public areas were still stunning. The gem of the entire building, and completely missed in your post, was the bar on the first floor. It was incredibly decorated, pretty much intact, and hadn't been in use since Father Divine purchased the hotel if not before.

If anyone is serious about researching buildings in Philly, including the Divine Lorraine, head on down to the Historical Commission (http://www.phila.gov/historical/index.html). The have incredible files and photos of many buildings.

ijdkamp said...

For my Photojournalism class last fall I lead a crusade of young photographers into the hotel on 4 different occasions. On the last visit we made a documentary about the Divine Lorraine. Check it out if you're interested.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZNY1B7RVG8

Jason Evan Mihalko, Psy.D. said...

I'm glad I found our website. It is such a wonderful reminder of the immanence of life--and the importance of preserving history.

Claire said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
R R said...

What a wonderful place.
I wish I could have visited when it was on it's splendor. It must have been amazing.
Your photos are incredible.
Thank you!

Maxwell Peterson said...

Tragic. The Divine Lorraine is only one of the most visible and stunning of Philadelphia's 40,000 vacant properties. Unfortunately, with a building of this size and scope, once the process of destroying it begins, the economics of turning around the deterioration become prohibitive. Clearly, the private market could not make this building work, even during the recent heyday. I think options for public support for this project are dwindling, especially in light of Federal debt discussions. I wonder if the recent developments on North Broad Street (Vetri, Starr, Blumenfeld) will support continuing investment? I think it may be the only remaining hope, as the Temple-Center City link fills in.

Jennifer K. said...

We were on a recent trip to visit ESP and happened to pass by the Divine Lorraine. I'm so glad to see you've written this. I have an almost irrational love for old buildings. My heart breaks to think of what this building could be and how it is being left to rot. I would love to stay updated if there are any preservation efforts.

JHill said...

Great photos, we were in there Summer of '05:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jhill/sets/1272722/

Anonymous said...

Thank you for these amazing photos and for telling the sad story of this amazing building. We were just in Philly for the weekend and drove past it totally at random, and we were STUNNED by what an amazing building it is. So sad that it is being destroyed piece by piece by a soulless predator.

brian said...

My first day on a new job, in a new city drove me past this magnificient building. They were blocking up all windows and doorways up to the 3rd floor. I was fascinated and wanted to learn all I could about this building. Your picture and narrative were so well done. Thank you and I also hope that someone is able to follow through and restore this gem.

Charles said...

What a wonderful set. The chapel is amazing. Beautiful photos.

Anonymous said...

Just drove past the Lorriane today. It looks like it was prime real estate in its day. I hope to see some restoration project documented on television. Best of luck.

Kevin McConnaughay said...

Nice post, thanks for the pictures. I'm new to Philadelphia and I've been wondering about that building.

HarryH said...

When I left home in 1969, I had $48.00, a job and two weeks before my first pay check. I got a room at the Divine Lorraine Hotel and lived there for almost a year. I will never forget how nice the people were. I am a caucasian and not a member of Father Divine's congregation. They helped me get a start in life. I hate to see the hotel in this kind of shape. The city should take the building and sell it to someone reputable.

memorial online said...

Holy... It's seems like after zombie infest, everything is so abandoned...
Great photos, indeed.

James North said...

Very nice and beautiful pics,i like it.

Thanks for sharing

Sir Dave said...

This is a lovely blog on the Divine Lorraine. If only someone would restore it to its former glory. Thanks so much!

MI said...

Great photos. Never seen them before. Thanks for sharing.

Menaka Indrani

me said...

wow, beautiful pictures and narrative. Thank you. I'm appalled by this rape of history.

sEthhEitz said...

i would love to show you photos of my visit into the building last year. it is sad to see the current state of this historically significant building, as currently each and every floor is gutted coMpletely to the bare bones :(

Florence said...

Just drove past this amazing building and had to find out more. I'm so sorry to know it has been gutted and hope there will be some way to restore it before it crumbles.

Michelle said...

Just drove by this amazing buiding this morning on the way to Temple and had to investigate it's past such a shame a great building has fallen disrepair!!!

ladydeluxehotel said...

amazing post.. those photos were absolutely great.. But what happened to Divine Lorraine Hotel is sad.. Hoping that it can be saved.. It looks beautiful when it was not yet ruined..

Goggla said...

Ugh, this makes my heart ache. I just returned from a trip to Philly (I live in NYC) and I was struck by how much the city in general seems to value its history and preservation. NYC is currently destroying everything historically and culturally significant in the name of greed and I had thought Philly was better than that. I really hope something can be done to save this building as it is a gorgeous piece of architecture, is rich in history, and has so much potential. Thank you for sharing your beautiful photos of it.

Heather Kiley said...

I have passed by the Divine Lorraine many times while bringing my son to Shriner's Hospital. I have always loved it and wondered about it's past. Thank you for your photos. It is so sad to see such a beautiful piece of history deteriorating like this. Hopefully it will be brought back to its former life soon!!

tetyana said...

Amazing photos! Thanks for sharing..

Heather said...

Greed, oh greed, gets me down. Wonderful photos, great write up. The last picture captures the mood in summary.

Daniela Heiskanen said...

I just want to say that I have been following your blog for over two years, and I think your photographs are amazing and very inspiring. Thank you!

Janice said...

I am in love with this building and it's history. Thanks for doing this piece on it!

kemo said...

Love the article, thanks for sharing. I recently walked past the hotel and I couldn't take my eyes off of it. I was curious about it and now you've sparked my curiosity even more after reading about its history. Soon, I am going out there to take some photos of the place.

Ally said...

Is this building for sale now? I am looking into rehabbing some of Philadelphia's old buildings and this is one I looked at for a long time but heard someone bought it. So never looked into it.

chris said...

It must have been a beautiful building in its prime.

hegibson said...

I had the opportunity to see this hotel this past weekend 9/8/2011 and it was unreal! My father told me of the history when I was a little girl and its still brings chills up my spine. Wow!

Anonymous said...

I was in the Divine Lorraine a couple weeks ago and took some pictures. It has deteriorated to a much greater extent since your photos were taken. you can see the pictures in my facebook album (it's available to view publicly)

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10100296786354643.2580006.8216270&type=1

steve on the slow train said...

I've been fascinated with the Father Divine movement and its strange mix of racial integration, sexual abstinence. Father Divine was not the first to declare himself God, and I'm sure he won't be the last. But his movement was historically significant. Surely his former headquarters deserves preservation.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the amazing tour. I am an engineer and have always been strangely drawn to the structure and fascinated by it every time I drive up and down Broad Street traveling to my part-time job teaching at Temple. Now that I know a little of the history, it is even more fascinating and it would be a terrible shame to lose this piece of Philadelphia and National history! Are there any active plans, or societies dedicated to purchasing/restoring the building? If so, can you post who they are and how to contact them?

Dr. Chronicity said...

Thank you so very much for sharing this amazing structure with the world. I lived in Philadelphia in the early 2000s and my son now attends Temple University. I've often wondered about this gorgeous building. Your pictures are truly wonderful and illustrate the extreme level of disinterest that exists in our culture for such endeavors as preservation. So sad. How will we ever learn from our mistakes?! Is anyone currently engaged in a preservation project?

Anonymous said...

I was living on a graduate student fellowship in the early 1970s, and a restaurant meal meant dinner at the Divine Lorraine. The kind ladies of the Lorraine took pity on this skinny little white girl and loaded my plate with hot, delicious food and gorgeous desserts--rice pudding to die for, and the best fried chicken I've ever had anywhere. Can't remember the price, but it was probably not much more than $1. The place was beautiful and spotless. Sure hope someone rescues this grand old lady.

raafi said...

Amazing space, amazing photos. Thanks!

Ophidian said...

I actually was there last year. All of this is completely gone. The halls are gutted, it's completely open space inside window to window both ways

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vicki said...

I pass this wonderful building every day in my travels through the city. I only wish I could win the lottery and but this place redo the inside for the homeless and low income housing. I can dream can't I? thanks for the pictures. The man who bought her should be ashamed of himself!!!!

Anonymous said...

HOW CAN I HELP...PEACE TONY ELOHIM

Anonymous said...

I marvel every day at the beauty of this structure as I drive to work. According to this recent article, there may be a possible buyer for the Divine Lorraine. http://www.philly.com/philly/news/local/139167699.html

Anonymous said...

so many old buildings have unhealthy qualities evolve them I appreciate the history and the true the man he was probably should be celebrated in so findage as the true hero he was!... Pictures and artifacts preserved...However rebuilding of better quality structures with newly evolved materials always too is part of a nations rebirth.. and healtier for all concerned.. then perhaps a memorial tribute to a man ever that evolves... can anyone ever say weather the man in his afterlife would want this?...

Tucker Fulwiler said...

I live in Baltimore, MD. My son is in his first year at Temple U. From my first passing by of the DLH, I have been fascinated by the building, both it's current state of urban dystopian near-collapse and for its obvious suggestion of a once splendid earlier incarnation and use.

Thank you SO MUCH for your 2006 photo essay. From its current state, I would never have guessed that as little as 5 years ago it was as intact as your photos demonstrate! The "developer" so instrumental in this precipitous decline deserves a special place in Hell for his efforts. Father Divine will see to that if he has any mojo left to wield from the Great Beyond.

Abby said...

I drove by this building a few years ago and fell in love with it. I would love in my lifetime to see it restored to its former glory. It is one of the most beautiful buildings in Philly. If i ever hit the lottery restoring it will be on the top of list

The Philadelphia Salon said...

There is an amazing project just starting to turn the Divine Lorraine into Philadelphia's newest art museum and artists center along with many other uses of the surrounding property. It's an ambitious project spearheaded by and artist run organization, The Philadelphia Salon. Look out for more info on this in the coming months as we fund-raise and work with developers.
there is a video about the beginnings of the project on youtube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAG0aF6rXxQ

It is really such a shame to see what one lazy, greedy "development" group could do to a landmark building. Hopefully our dreams for it will be it's fabulous future.

Anonymous said...

I have lived in Philly, and been obsessed with this gorgeous building for the past 5 years. I drive by it daily, as now I live in Northern Liberties. I am glad I finally decided to research it, and very happy that I found this, thanks!!

Anonymous said...

I go to school at Temple University and I fell in love with this building as soon as I laid eyes on it. It is just so majestic and beautiful I would HATE to see it torn down. How can I get involved with the preservation of this beautiful local landmark?

kstew said...

I drove by this place a year ago and can't get it out of my mind...what is happening with it now?

kstew said...

I love this place! i drove by it a year ago and can't get it out of my mind! what's going on with it now?

Jinnie K said...

Thank you for taking these magnificent photos and for the info. My family lived a few blocks down Fairmount when I was born. My sister and I are planning a historical, fact finding trip back to this old neighborhood. It is very sad to see this beautiful building going to ruin. Shame on the current owners!

lederach lisa said...

Happened by the Divine yesterday after visiting Angel Alley on the way to the Art Museum's Van Gogh exhibit. I abhor how the developer gutted this historical and architecturally important structure. I agree that something should be done to reclaim this jewel of North Philadelphia. Let's work to see what can be done.

Anonymous said...

in my walk around the city I stumbled upon the Divine Lorraine Hotel...And indeed it must have been in its heyday. I hate all developers, esp. the ones in New York where I live because they are the lowest human trash destroying architecture and history in the name of "greed". If a building or structure is up for landmarking they will make sure to tear it down before that can happen. And it's already been done by Rudy Giuliani who allowed one developer to take down an iconic roller coaster in Coney Island.

Antonio Knoy said...

Just fell in love with the Lorraine. Visiting from Seattle, I will connect with the art salon rehab efforts. Thank you so much for your research. I'll do what I can to help.

Anonymous said...

Hello, I recently saw men cutting
the side yard of the Hotel ,and I
asked them if there was a new ...
buyer for her...they replied "yes"
I hope they are right ...and some
smart investors can breath new life
back into a Wonderful landmark !I
would have loved to tour her before
the gutting...
Just think what those
walls would say! Thank you !

Cheryl York said...

Hello,
I just found a letter sent to my father from his brother. I wanted to see if the hotel was still up. The letter reads " Hi Joe, This is the hotel I stayed at in Philadelphia for one day. The room for one day costs $2.50, has a phone and very nice rungs, bath room and whatever you can think up. I am sending this as souvenir, John. The post mark date is September 8, 1942 in the hotel envelope and on letter head.
I am glad to see its still standing yet.
just wanted to share!

Anonymous said...

So beautiful and so sad

Anonymous said...

Since I was six I have loved this building and now I am 29 and feelings are the same. In 2006 I did a project on Father Divine regarding the power of persuasion and the story behind him and the hotel is incredible. I did try to enter the building by contacting you, but kindly you said I could not enter due to the owner or something to that matter. I would hate to see this building be demolished. I think if the owner agreed to put forth the effort to restore that the community would be more than happy to volunteer in some form. One of my dreams since a child has been to enter the building and imagine the presence of the past. The only life I have ever seen in the building was a nun sitting in the window on the right side of the building in one of the middle floors.

Anonymous said...

Please keep this building up and restore it. Please don't let it be destroyed. Once it's gone, you can't take it back. I grew up in a town that had a very historical landmark that was demolished in 1983 to build a new school. The building was originally owned by a Quaker and later became one of the most prestigious all girl schools in Pa, maybe the US. Sister Cornelia Connelly started the school. The building was build in the mid to late 1800's. It's such a shame that the part of the towns actual identity is gone. Please don't let that happen here. The historic buildings are all that there is to a town or city's history and identity. Please do good with your wealth.

Anonymous said...

Well it sure beats my Philadelphia condo!
-Jackie @ PhillyLiving

Anonymous said...

My mame is David Goldsmid and I was a local 30 B reroofer working for Mcallister roofing . Ive worked on tbe lorrines fopf many times in good weather and in bad storms.At that time it was really nice.My best memories are watcing the flyers parade after they won the stanly cup.And having to go up on the roof to restrap a excaust fans cover that had come loose and was flapping.in high winds.qmd poring rain.I jave many memories of Devines properitys Macallisters roofing held tbe devine account .foor roofing and.structurel matince at most property s yoe ive been all over woodmont.To really get a gpod look go sit on tje copper sign stating peace
.

sunny d said...

does anyone know if/where there are pictures of the inside of the building when it was in its prime?

Rhonda B said...

I was just there over this past weekend. I have fallen in love with this building the first time I saw it. I walked all around it, and photographed it, and went inside the fencing to get some shots without the fence, I am in awe this place is just rotting away. It is truly amazing.....I wish I was, or I knew a millionaire..... what a shame it is just sitting there......

Katherine said...

I love this building, though I have never visited her in person.
I found today this news.. the Divine Lorraine might very well be saved.

http://6abc.com/realestate/redevelopment-underway-at-the-divine-lorraine-hotel/96154/